oasis warehouse

ANIMAL WELFARE POLICY

  • Oasis and Warehouse are committed to good animal welfare standards where materials derived from animals are used in our products.
  • Increasingly, we are required to provide robust assurances to our customers that the ethics we support are adhered to by our suppliers. To do this, we require all partners in the supply chain to provide information, documentation and other evidence to show good animal welfare standards are followed.
  • Suppliers are required to follow all standards set out below (standards apply to both samples and bulk production).
  • We ask suppliers to communicate this policy to their direct suppliers/factories, and, in turn, to ask your suppliers to inform their direct suppliers of the policy and so forth along the supply chain so that eventually producers, farms, transporter, abattoirs and others involved in handling animals are made aware of the standards and can demonstrate compliance.
  • We recognise it may be challenging for supply chain partners to obtain documentation and reassurances about good animal welfare practices from further up the supply chain but these challenges can only be overcome by continual efforts made by all those in the supply chain.
  • Demonstrating good animal welfare is to the mutual benefit of all those in the supply chain.
  • If any of the below standards require clarification please contact your buyer, technologist or Anita Nagarajan, Ethical Trading Manager.
  • Please sign and return the policy (see last page) as confirmation you comply with the standards in the policy.
1 Good animal welfare standards must be followed throughout all stages of an animal’s life
  Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
 

Any materials derived from animals must only come from those animals where there has been a good state of animal welfare throughout the animal’s life, as defined by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). Similarly high welfare standards are acceptable providing these can be demonstrated.

Definition of good state of animal welfare can be found in Chapter 7.1 of both the Terrestrial and Aquatic Codes of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).

Speak to your supplier to find out what animal welfare standards exist throughout all stages of the animal’s life. This includes welfare standards at farm, transport, abattoir and where anyone is involved in handling animals (e.g. shearing wool). They will need to tell you about recognised animal welfare standards.

It may be necessary to visit farms/abattoirs or other sites where animals are to gain reassurance about good welfare practices. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of animal materials are used or where you have a representative in the country who can visit the animals.

It is insufficient for suppliers to simply tell us that animals are well looked after or good animal welfare standards exist where no reasonable effort has been made to obtain evidence and information on welfare standards. This may include copies of certificates or audits. NB: As this may take some time, investigate supply chain in advance of buyers booking product.

Definition: As defined by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), ‘Animal welfare means how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. An animal is in a good state of welfare if (as indicated by scientific evidence) it is healthy, comfortable, well nourished, safe, able to express innate behaviour, and if it is not suffering from unpleasant states such as pain, fear and distress. Good animal welfare requires disease prevention and appropriate veterinary treatment, shelter, management and nutrition, humane handling and humane slaughter or killing. Animal welfare refers to the state of the animal; the treatment that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane treatment’.

NB: The World Organisation for Animal Health has 180 member countries.

See World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Introduction to the Recommendations for Animal Welfare, Chapter 7, Article 7.1 (Terrestrial and Aquatic codes).https://www.oie.int/international-standard-setting/overview/

RSPCA welfare standards for farm animals http://science.rspca.org.uk/sciencegroup/farmanimals/standards

Five Freedoms http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121007104210/http:/www.fawc.org.uk/freedoms.htm

2 No endangered species
  Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
 

Endangered species must not be used in any Oasis and Warehouse products. Endangered species are those listed by either the Convention in International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) or International Union of Conservation of Nature (IUCN)’s Red List.

Do not procure products/materials from unidentifiable species or if you are not sure of the conservation status of the product/material (check against both CITES and IUCN’s Red List).

You may need to provide a fibre composition report as evidence that the species of any animal/plant is not endangered.

Obtain Country of Origin Certificate of the product/material (NB: in some cases, only species from certain countries may be endangered).

Pay particular attention to wool and leather species, embellished items and jewellery. NB: teeth, shell, pearls, feathers, bone, turtles, tortoise, tortoiseshell and tropical hardwood may be endangered; shahtoosh, must

Plants that have certified sustainable sources can be used, e.g. Forest Stewardship Council wood.

To identify threatened species go to: CITES: www.cites.org NB: Appendix I: lists species threatened with extinction. Only in exceptional cases is trade in specimens of these species permitted. Appendix II: sets out species not necessarily threatened with extinction, but in which trade must be controlled to ensure survival of species. Appendix III: contains species protected in at least one country, which has asked other CITES Parties for assistance in controlling the trade.

IUCN:http://www.iucnredlist.org

3 No exotic skins/leathers
  Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
  Exotic skins include snake, alligator, crocodile, lizard, ostrich, emu, kangaroo, eel, shark and stingray. Whether endangered or not, these skins cannot be used. Do not procure skins/leathers from those animals listed on the left. You may need to provide a fibre composition report to demonstrate species of animal. Please make sure you talk to the buyer or designer at sampling stage about the species of skin proposed to ensure it meets our policy. https://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-clothing/exotic-skins-animals/
4 No use of real fur
  Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
 

Real animal fur or pelts must not be used in any Oasis and Warehouse product or sample. <,

Provide fibre composition report as evidence that the material is not real fur.

Ensure samples, products, trims or accessories you have sourced have synthetic labelling/information.

It can be difficult to tell real fur from artificial fur (regardless of price). Pay special attention to fur trimmed items as these may not be artificial.

According to the Humane Society1 , raccoon dogs are bred for their fur in China and Finland and their fur has either been misrepresented as fake fur or claimed as another species.

To identify real from fake fur:

Humane society: http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/pdfs/fur/field-guide-on-real-vs-fake-fur-final.pdf

Fur free alliance http://action.peta.org.uk/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=5&ea.campaign.id=23870

5 No angora wool can be used
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

No angora wool can be used in any Oasis and Warehouse product or sample.

Provide fibre composition report as evidence that the material is not real angora yarn. Do not source any product, trims or accessories that do not come with synthetic labelling/information.

In 2013 PETA reported on inhumane treatment of angora rabbits in China.
https://secure.peta.org.uk/page/17620/petition/1 PETA investigated again in 2015: https://headlines.peta.org/humane-angora-farms-china-audit/

 
6 No use of down
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
Down is banned and cannot be used in any Oasis and Warehouse product or sample. Ensure no down is used. Ensure samples, products, trims or accessories you have sourced have synthetic labelling/information.    
 
1 http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/raccoon_dogs/
 
7 No use of mohair
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
Mohair is banned and cannot be used in any of Oasis and Warehouse product or sample Ensure no mohair is used. Ensure samples, products, trims or accessories you have sourced have synthetic labelling/information.    
8 Merino wool must not be mulesed and all types of wool must come from animals in a good state of animal welfare
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

Merino wool must be nonmulesed. All types of wool must come from animals in a good state of animal welfare (see standard 1 above).

Adult sheep of breeds which have continuously growing wool should be shorn at least once every year to help reduce the risk of external parasites and keep the animals comfortable. Shearing has to be carried out carefully and sympathetically to avoid problems such as handling stress and injuries. Shorn sheep must be managed correctly to protect them from weather conditions.

Shearing should be undertaken by competent operators who avoid causing cuts and injuries to sheep.

A

ustralian merino wool: obtain the International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) combined certificate test report to show mulesing status (this can be procured from the top maker who purchase greasy wool from brokers/farms);

South African merino wool: Obtained country of origin certificate.

New Zealand merino wool: Obtain country of origin certificate and evidence that the wool is non-mulesed.

Trace your supply chain back to farm (packing list will have this information)

As prey animals, sheep should be handled gently as they can experience stress and fear easily. They should be kept with other sheep and not separated for long periods. The RSPCA Australia states ‘Research shows the pain of mulesing is similar to that of castration, but it lasts longer (up to 48 hours). The RSPCA is opposed to practices that cause suffering or distress to animals and does not accept that mulesing should be performed as a routine husbandry procedure. It should be the last option farmers choose to control flystrike and only when the risk of flystrike is very high’2 .

NB: Lameness is a common problem in sheep. Castration, tail docking and stitching wounds may be practiced without the use of pain killers. RSPCA recommends pain relief wherever possible.

Where Mongolian fur is proposed please ensure you can demonstrate a good state of animal welfare of the animal (see standard 1 above).

http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-clothing/woolindustry/mulesing/
9 Yak wool must come from domesticated herds only
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

Yak wool must be from domesticated herds only.

Obtain information from your supplier to demonstrate that yak wool does not come from endangered species.

Obtain the country of origin certificate for yak wool. NB: As this may take some time, it should be investigated well before sample stage.

Under CITES, Bos Mutus (wild yak) is listed under Appendix 1. See Standard 2, Resources. http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/23/snow-leopards-yaks-cashmere-gaots-fashion
10 No use of materials from foetal, aborted or newly born animals
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

No skins, hides, leather or wool must be used from aborted animals, foetal animals, unborn calves or newly born animals. This includes slink, Karakul/Broadtail and lambskin pelts from aborted or newborn lambs.

Ensure you know from your supplier that skins or wool have not come from aborted, unborn or newly born animals and, where possible, obtain documentary evidence of animal (you may need to contact supply chain partners to obtain information from farm/abattoir about the age of animal when killed for its meat). It may also mean visiting the farm or abattoirs to gain reassurance no aborted or foetal animals are used. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of animal materials are used or where you have a representative in the country who can visit the animals. See important information.

Pay particular attention to especially soft wool, skins and leather and animal hides that are very small.

Note that Karakul is a lambskin that has several different names, including Broadtail, Astrakhan and Persian lamb, amongst others.

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) says that ‘under normal circumstances, pregnant animals that are in final 10% of their gestation period at the planned time of unloading at the slaughterhouse should be neither transported nor slaughtered’. See OIE’s Terrestrial Code, Chapter 7.5 and Article 7.5.5 for full standard on foetuses.

Health (OIE) , Slaughter of Animals, Article 7.5.5

http://www.oie.int/index.php?id=169&L=0&htmfile=chapitre_aw_slaughter.htm
 
2 http://kb.rspca.org.au/What-is-mulesing-and-what-are-the-alternatives_113.html
 
11 No animal must be killed for the primary use of their skins/material. This includes mother of pearl.
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

Any use of leather, skins, feathers or other animal derived product must only be procured as a by-product of the meat industry (i.e. no animal must be killed for the primary use of their skins/ material)3 .

You will need to ask your supply chain partners to provide evidence or information that material is a by-product of the meat industry (e.g. profile information on type of business the farm/supplier is). It may also mean visiting the farms or abattoirs to gain reassurance of whether animals are primarily killed for their meat. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of animal materials are used or where you have a representative in the country who can visit the animals.

Investigate the supply chain to find out the country of origin of material. In the case of leather, this will need to be beyond the tannery. As this information is likely to take a long time to obtain, investigate supply chain in advance of buyers booking product.

Some farms have animal welfare certification schemes, e.g. RSPCA Assured is a UK assurance and food label aimed at improving farm animal welfare. Ask the farm if they have any certificates or audits of animal welfare standards and obtain a copy.

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) provides capacity building programme to assist countries implement OIE animal welfare standards on land, transport and slaughter. NB: The World Organisation for Animal Health has 180 member countries.

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) standards:http://www.oie.int/en/animal-welfare/improved-animal-welfare-programme/

OIE, Slaughter of Animals, Article 7.5.5 http://www.oie.int/index.php?id=169&L=0&htmfile=chapitre_aw_slaughter.htm

For more information on Five Freedoms: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121007104210/http:/www.fawc.org.uk/freedoms.htm

 
3 This excludes wool where animal is not killed but bred for their wool.
4 This excludes wool but only where the animal is not killed for their wool (i.e. the animal must be bred for their wool and still alive during/after wool has been sheared).
6 http://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/January-2010/Down-With-Live-Plucked-Down/
7 https://www.four-paws.org.au/campaigns-topics/topics/animal-in-fashion/live-feather-plucking
 
12 No live plucking of feathers or obtaining skins/coat while animal is still alive and no feathers, leather, skins or hides where live boiling of animals is practiced.
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

No skins, coats or feathers must be obtained from animals when they are still alive, including no live plucking of birds for their feathers or animals for their wool/skin (forced or assisted molting is not allowed)4 . Similarly, no feathers, leathers, hides or skins must be obtained from live boiling of animals

Ask your supply chain partners how skins, coat or feathers were obtained from the animal and obtain evidence of this. This may mean visiting the farms, abattoirs or suppliers to gain reassurance that no live plucking/skinning or live boiling takes place. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of leather, skins and feather are used or where you have a representative in the country. NB that live plucking of birds is a concern in China, Hungary, Poland, Germany, and Russia and so it is important that farms in these countries can demonstrate this practice does not take place5 .

It will clearly take time to find out how feathers are obtained from birds so ensure you investigate supply chain in advance of buyers booking product.

Live plucking is illegal in the EU and US but concerns have been raised that this still takes place in main down producing countries6 7 .

Feathers are likely to be mixed with sources from several countries but it is still important that you aim to find out if feathers are from farms/suppliers that practice live plucking/boiling and that these feathers are not used.

Four paws:https://www.four-paws.org.au/campaigns-topics/topics/animal-in-fashion/live-feather-plucking

RSPCA: http://www.rspca.org.uk/allaboutanimals/farm/poultry/ducks/keyissues

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) http://www.oie.int/international-standard-setting/overview/

Five Freedoms https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121010012427/http://www.fawc.org.uk/freedoms.htm

13 No feathers must come from birds used to produce foie gras.
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

No feathers must come from birds used to produce foie gras.

Find out the species of bird and obtain documentary evidence of this. Avoid feathers from Mule/Mulard ducks and Landes/Landaise goose as these are commonly used for foie gras8 . This may mean visiting the farms or abattoirs to gain reassurance that no foie gras birds are used. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of feathers are used or you have a representative in the country.

Find out which country the feathers are from and obtain a country of origin certificate (avoid feathers from France, Hungary, Bulgaria, China/Beijing and US, Belgium and Spain)9

Ask what welfare standards are in place (see standard 1 above).

Foie gras is produced in Belgium, Bulgaria, Spain, France and Hungary.

It has been made illegal in nine Austrian provinces, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.10

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

https://www.oie.int/international-standard-setting/overview/

Four Paws http://www.four-paws.org.uk/campaigns/farm-animals/geese-and-duck/

5 http://www.four-paws.org.uk/campaigns/farm-animals/geese-and-duck/
8 https://www.ciwf.org.uk/media/3818850/foie-gras-factsheet.pdf
9 https://www.ciwf.org.uk/media/3818850/foie-gras-factsheet.pdf
10 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foie_gras_controversy#Legal_status
14 No veal leather/hides can be used where veal calves have been reared in veal crates
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

No veal leather/hides from veal reared in veal crates. It is preferable if veal hides/leather are sourced from UK sources and preferably from animals reared to RSPCA calf rearing welfare standards.

Obtain evidence of species of leather/hides. If this is veal, find out country of origin and if veal crates were used. You may need to visit the farms or abattoirs to gain reassurance that veal crates are not used. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of leather/skins and used or you have a country representative.

Veal crates (small, confined pens which male calves are reared in) were banned in the UK in 1990 and EU in 2006.

The RSPCA states that UK veal has higher welfare standards than other EU countries. Veal hides from the UK should be used rather than other countries (NB: there are still concerns about the live export of UK veal to other countries).

Please also note that calves raised in loosed housed systems must have sufficient food, nutrients and comfortable bedding.

Compassion in World Farming http://www.ciwf.org.uk/farm-animals/cows/veal-calves/

RSPCA
RSPCA supplementary standards for rearing calves can be found in the: RSPCA welfare standards for dairy cattle http://science.rspca.org.uk/sciencegroup/farmanimals/standards/dairycattle

RSPCA welfare standards for beef cattle http://science.rspca.org.uk/sciencegroup/farmanimals/standards/beefcattle

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) http://www.oie.int/international-standard-setting/overview/

Five Freedoms http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121007104210/http:/www.fawc.org.uk/freedoms.htm

15 Cashmere cannot be sourced where herds are not well cared for or where there are conservation concerns
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources

Cashmere must only be obtained from goats where there are good animal welfare practices, as defined by Animal Welfare Approved. Similarly high welfare standards can also be used providing this can be demonstrated. Cashmere must only be procured from producers with ecologically sustainable and conservation friendly practices in place.

Obtain the country of origin certificate for cashmere. Speak to your suppliers to find out what welfare standards are followed and how their wool is obtained?

Source cashmere from producers involved in programmes that are ecologically and conservation friendly. Obtain documentary evidence of this.

It may be necessary to visit goat farms/suppliers to gain reassurance about good welfare practices. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of animals materials are used or where you have a representative in the country who can visit the animals.

NB: As this may take some time, investigate supply chain in advance of buyers booking product.

Goats can be injured and subjected to painful procedures; goats may suffer from being cold when their coats are sheared There should be no tethering of animals and no shearing during cold climates.

According to the Ecologist, the snow leopard and other species in the Himalayas and Central Asia are threatened by the growth of cashmere goat herds11.

The UK is among the top four importers of Mongolian cashmere. Mongolia cashmere goat population has increased from just 5m in 1990 to almost 14m in 2010. Ninety percent of cashmere comes from China and Mongolia12.

There are projects that exist that assist farmers to produce commercial cashmere and that have good conservation practices. For example, in Pakistan, an insurance scheme for livestock has reduced retaliatory killing of snow leopards13 .

http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2085664/snow_leopard_survival_threatened_by_our_love_of_cashmere.html

11 http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2085664/snow_leopard_survival_threatened_by_our_love_of_cashmere.html
12 http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/23/snow-leopards-yaks-cashmere-gaots-fashion
13 https://www.wwfpak.org/species/SnowLeopard_whatwedo.php
14 http://www.rspca.org.uk/servlet/BlobServer?blobtable=RSPCABlob&blobcol=urlblob&blobkey=id&blobwhere=1109267162699&bl obheader=application/pdf
16 No ostrich feathers from threatened species
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
  No ostrich feathers must come from species that are threatened.

CITES list the following countries as having endangered species of ostriches: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, the Niger, Nigeria, Senegal and the Sudan (you must refer to the most recent CITES Appendix to ensure information is up to date).

Obtain country of origin certificate to demonstrate ostriches are not from countries with endangered populations.

There should be absolutely no live plucking of ostriches. Ensure you can obtain information/documents from your supplier to demonstrate this.

It may be necessary to visit farms/abattoirs or other places to gain reassurance about good welfare practices. This should be relatively easy where domestic sources of animals materials are used or where you have a representative in the country who can visit the animals.

NB: As this may take some time, investigate supply chain in advance of buyers booking product.

Note that the RSPCA has expressed concerns about welfare standards of UK ostrich farms, with similar concerns in Germany too14 .
17 No cosmetic or hygiene product to be tested on animals
Standard to follow How to follow standard Important information Resources
  No cosmetic or hygiene product or ingredients can be tested on animals, in line with EU law. Where any cosmetic or hygiene product is sold outside the EU, the cut-off date for no animal testing on either the product or ingredients is 1 August 1994.

Know the ingredients in your product and ensure none have been tested on animals (or none tested since 1 Aug 1994 if sold outside EU).

If you test any of your products/ingredients on animals for sale outside the EU, please tell us.

It has been illegal to test cosmetics products and ingredients on animals in the UK since 1997 and 1998 respectively, and animal testing of cosmetics ingredients has been illegal across Europe since 2009. From March 2013 it has been illegal to import and sell cosmetics in the EU that have been tested anywhere else in the world.

NB: China’s laws have changed and domestic production of ordinary cosmetics (make-up and nail varnish) no longer have to be tested on animals.

http://www.leapingbunny.org/